THE WEIRD YEARS

Credit: Shervin Lainez

Credit: Shervin Lainez

For Immediate Release: March 29, 2019

The Weird Years are a dreamy folk-pop quartet based in both Nashville and Brooklyn. Today they've released their debut, self-titled EP -- a record that For The Rabbits describes as "equal parts breezy melodies and hidden complexity" -- showcasing a clearly defined aesthetic built around gorgeous harmony stacks, haunting arpeggios, and ethereal textures. In an interview with Atwood Magazine, out today, the band explains the meaning behind each song on the EP, as well as how each song came to fruition. Jump in, here.

"A breathtaking masterpiece, 'The Weird Years' [sic] channels ethereal music into cinematic reflections on loneliness and isolation, love, hope, and connection in dark times."
Atwood Magazine

The Weird Years is Billy Libby (of Fort Gorgeous), Hannah Winkler and Bess Rogers (both formerly of Secret Someones; Winkler is also in Human Natural, and Rogers recently played guitar for Broadway's Head Over Heels), and Chris Kuffner (producer and instrumentalist for A Great Big World, Secret Someones, Ingrid Michaelson and others). A supergroup of sorts, multiple members currently work with Ingrid Michaelson and A Great Big World, and as producers and touring/studio musicians for those and other bands, in addition to working on their own projects. The band members' wealth of musical experience creates perfectly odd pop gems with a singular and deliberately-sustained mood. 

The Weird Years EP is about the push and pull between feelings of isolation vs. connection. It opens with, "Stranger," which drifts forward gently as "Rogers and Winkler’s breathtaking vocals flow into the mix like fog in a rainforest" (Atwood). "It's about feeling isolated on this solo journey we are all on," the band says, "but how, despite that feeling, we have people in our lives or in our memories that make us feel less alone." Likewise, "Ticking Time," (which is bookended by otherworldly instrumental interludes) is about the dread and melancholy that goes along with the realization that time will eventually separate you from the one you love, and "Body and Brain" explores the idea that no matter how connected you are to another person, you are still separate entities in both a physical and emotional sense. "It's about the forces that govern the proximity of both of those things throughout time," the band says. The EP closes with "New Ever After" -- a love song about the end of the world. 

The Weird Years EP--out today--is perfectly timed for an early spring release, pairing well with a long walk in the forest at dusk, a mug of hot tea, or just a pair of headphones and closed eyes. For media inquiries, please contact Caitlin Pasko at caitlin@drunkenpiano.com

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RIYL: 

Here We Go Magic, Phoebe Bridgers, Radiohead,
First Aid Kit, Bodies Be Rivers, Pearl and the Beard

PRESS CONTACT

caitlin@drunkenpiano.com

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PRESS

“Gorgeous harmonies, soul-touching vocals and a mellow world to get lost in."
- STEREOFOX

“Soothing and experimental, ‘Stranger’ secures The Weird Years a place amongst the most interesting up-and-coming bands to watch.”
- THE WILD HONEY PIE

"Equal parts breezy melodies and hidden complexity... A sound that is entirely, and wonderfully, their own."
- FOR THE RABBITS

"An effortless individuality... One that tends to linger with listeners after it's over."
- POPMATTERS

"Infectious melodies, dreamy harmonies and smooth, ethereal-like vocals."
- CAESAR LIVE N LOUD

"Found footage [of] nature and distorting, kaleidoscopic effects [reflect] the darkness and mystery behind the track."
- CAFFEINATED JAM

“Beautiful floaty track that echoes The Staves and Fleetwood Mac in equal parts.”
- BEAUTIFUL SONG OF THE WEEK

"A soothing lilt with a faint experimental edge... [An] infectious ethereal warmth.”
- ATWOOD MAGAZINE

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